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Chemistry
Head: (Acting Head) P.H.M. Budzelaar
Campus Address/General Office: 360 Parker Building
Telephone: (204) 474 9321
Fax: (204) 474 7608
Email Address: 

Chemistry_Dept@umanitoba.ca

Website: 

http://umanitoba.ca/chemistry

Academic Staff: 

Please refer to webiste for Faculty information:

http://umanitoba.ca/chemistry

Chemistry Grad Program Info

A M.Sc. or Ph.D. in the chemical sciences provides a gateway to an exciting, challenging and frequently high-paying career. M.Sc. and Ph.D. chemists work in areas such as industrial research and development (particularly the pharmaceutical, energy, advanced materials and biotechnology sectors), medical research, environmental and pollution monitoring, and technical consulting. Ph.D. chemists and biochemists in academia have the opportunity both to teach and to pursue independent basic and applied research.

Graduate students work in close cooperation with faculty as they pursue their own thesis research projects. There are fascinating project opportunities available in the research groups within the department. Graduate courses are typically informal, and encourage small groups of students to discuss topics of current interest, in a supportive environment. The Department of Chemistry also hosts seminars throughout the year, bringing researchers from university and industrial laboratories in Winnipeg, across Canada, and abroad, to share their latest discoveries with students and faculty. The Armes Lectureship and Betts Lectureship programs provide for extended lecture series by world-renowned chemists, who are able to interact with faculty and graduate students during their visit to the department.

Graduates of the Chemistry M.Sc. and Ph.D. programs are currently employed in chemical companies, research institutes, government laboratories and agencies, and tenured academic positions. Some have even founded their own chemical companies! Alumni of the department’s graduate program now work for companies such as Apotex Fermentation, Medicure, Novopharm Biotech, Philips Paints and Border Chemicals in Winnipeg, Biovail (Steinbach), Anormed (Richmond, BC), Allelix (Mississauga), Uniroyal (Guelph), and Genzyme (Cambridge MA). Several have undertaken additional training with prominent scientists at such places as the Scripps Institute, MIT, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, and the universities of Alberta, British Columbia, Calgary, Montréal, Sherbrooke, and Toronto. Some have gone on to academic careers, at such universities as Alberta, Calgary, Cornell, Dalhousie, Guelph, Northern British Columbia, Queen’s, Toronto, York, as well as Manitoba.

Fields of Research

Analytical Chemistry, Asymmetric Organic Synthesis, Biochemistry, Cell Biology, Chromatography, Environmental Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry, Mass Spectrometry, Macromolecular Chemistry, Materials Science, Medicinal Chemistry, Natural Products Chemistry, NMR Spectroscopy, Organometallic Chemistry, Protein Structure and Dynamics, Synthetic Carbohydrate Chemistry, Theoretical Chemistry, Solid State Chemistry.

Research Facilities

The department has modern instrumentation and technical support for research and teaching. There is a full-time glassblower in the department who can produce specialized glassware as required. The University Libraries provide excellent on-line connections to scientific and medical databases and full-text access to major journals.

Computer facilities: campus-wide UNIX and NOVELL servers; Sunfire 6800 20-CPU high-performance computing installation; access to the Westgrid high-performance computing facilities; PC, Mac, UNIX and LINUX workstations in the department; a 14-node and 24-node Beowulf cluster constructed from 12 dual processor 2.8 GHz Xeon computers have been installed in the department.

NMR facilities: Bruker Avance300 and AMX 500 instruments, and a Varian INOVA 600 system; all are multi-nuclear and have pulsed field gradient capabilities; the AMX 500 and INOVA 600 are equipped for both liquid and solid-state work.

Mass Spectrometry: a two-sector high-resolution spectrometer with EI, CI and FAB sources, operational in positive and negative ion modes; a Quattro-LC triple quadrupole instrument equipped for electrospray ionization (ESI); a Bruker Biflex IV MALDI-TOF instrument for the analysis of large biomolecules; through the Physics department, Chemistry researchers have access to advanced experimental time-of-flight instruments.

Advanced Synthesis: A high throughput HPLC-MS-UV autopurification system (Waters) and a parallel organic synthesizer (quest).

The Ultra-Clean Trace Elements Laboratory (UCTEL): a metal-free class-1000 to Class 100 environment equipped with a PE Elan DRC II ICP-MS, a Waters non-metallic HPLC a CEM Mars V Microwave Digestion System, and a Tekran 2600 Mercury Analyzer.

Crystallography facilities: a high-resolution powder X-ray diffractometer with a high-temperature furnace. In addition the Department has access to single crystal diffractometers and cameras.

Thermal Analysis: a high-temperature thermal gravimetric/differential thermal analyzer (TGA/DTA) is available.

Spectroscopy facilities: a 15W argon laser with a 14018 double monochromator for Raman spectroscopy; a Fourier transform microwave spectrometer equipped with ion sources, Helmholtz coils and Stark plates.; an UV-Vis-NIR spectrophotometer (Varian Cary 5000), a coherent dye laser for intracavity photoacoustic spectroscopy; a Nicolet FT-IR system; a second Nicolet interferometer is equipped for solid-state FT-IR studies, and is also set up for Raman spectroscopy; a UV-vis diode array spectrophotometer; routine FT-IR and stopped flow equipment is also available.

Circular Dichroism Spectropolarimeter-Fluorometer: Our Jasco J-810 instrument is equipped with a computer-controlled Peltier device and circulating water bath for temperature control using both cylindrical and rectangular cells. The fluorescence accessory permits concurrent circular dichroism and fluorescence measurements between 163 and 900 nm.

Electrochemical facilities: a BAS 100A electrochemical workstation with rotating disk and controlled growth mercury drop electrode attachments; a CH Instruments 660 electrochemical workstation with a picoamp booster attachment for ultramicroelectrode measurements; a CH Instruments 400 electrochemical workstation with quartz crystal microbalance (QCM); a Solartron 1287 electrochemical interface and a 1255B frequency response analyzer for impedance measurements; and a Lecroy 9310A 400 MHz dual channel oscilloscope, a Stanford Research Systems SR560 amplifier and a Wavetek 182A function generator for fast scan cyclic voltammetry.

Surface and interfacial science facilities: a Kratos Axis Ultra high performance imaging x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) instrument; a JEOL JAMP-9500F field emission Auger microprobe/scanning electron microscope (SEM); a JOEL JEM-2100F advanced field emission transmission electron microscope (TEM); a CAMECA IMS 7f magnetic sector secondary ion mass spectrometer (SIMS); a Digital Instruments Nanoscope IV with a Dimension 3100 SPM, a closed-loop SPM, a MultiMode SPM with multiple heads, a universal bipotentiostat, and an EnviroScope AFM; a ThermoNicolet Nexus 870 FT-IR with a polarization modulated infrared reflectance absorbance spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS) and attenuated total reflectance spectroscopy (ATR) modules; a Sentech SE400 ellipsometer; and a Ramè-Hart computerized contact angle goniometer.

Chromatography facilities: numerous HPLC systems; a preparative HPLC/ MS system; a GPC system with light-scattering, refractive index, diode-array and electrochemical detectors.

Other equipment: A Differential Scanning Calorimeter with Intracooler and Ultramicrobalance (Perkin-Elmer DSC Diamond); a Spin Coater (Laurell Technologies); a Polarized Light Optical Microscope System with Heating/Cooling stage (Olympus/Linkam); a Dynamic Light Scattering Instrument for Particle Sizing (Microtrac Inc.); a Liquid Crystal Test-bed for testing electro-optical properties of LC-mixtures (LC Vision); a Pure-Water System; a Laminar Flow Clean-air workbench and an Ultrasonic Processor (Sonics).

Manitoba Chemical Analysis Lab (MCAL) A "state of art" chemical analysis facility (MCAL) is available in the Department of Chemistry. The laboratory offers a wide range of instrumentation for the analysis of biological, environmental and industrial samples. The facility is used for undergraduate used for undergraduate teaching laboratories and can be accessed by University researchers, graduate students and industry.

M.Sc. in Chemistry

Admission

Admission requirements are those of the Faculty of Graduate Studies found in the Graduate Studies Regulations Section of this Calendar.

Application Deadlines

Potential M.Sc. students should explore the Chemistry Department website, prior to making formal application to the department of Chemistry. They are encouraged to submit the on-line information form found on the website. The following deadlines for receipt of complete application materials apply to potential students holding bachelors’ degrees from Canadian and Non-Canadian universities.

Start Date

Canadian/U.S.

Non-Canadian

Regular

(September)

June 1

March 1

Winter

(January)

October 1

July 1

Spring

(May)

February 1

November 1

Summer

(July)

April 1

January 1

Program Requirements

Program requirements are those of the Faculty of Graduate Studies found in the Graduate Studies Regulations Section of this Calendar.

Colloquium: A weekly colloquium is given by members of staff, post-doctoral fellows, or invited lecturers. All graduate students and fourth-year Honours students are expected to attend the colloquia.

Second language reading requirement: none

Expected time to graduate: 2 years

Ph.D. in Chemistry

Admission

Admission requirements are those of the Faculty of Graduate Studies found in the Graduate Studies Regulations Section of this Calendar. Only students holding M.Sc. degrees from Canadian universities will be admitted directly into the Ph.D. program. Other students will be admitted as M.Sc. candidates, with the option to transfer into the Ph.D. program after 1 year of satisfactory studies.

Application Deadlines

Potential Ph.D. students should explore the Chemistry Department website, prior to making formal application to the department of Chemistry. They are encouraged to submit the on-line information form found on the website. The following deadlines for receipt of complete application materials apply to potential students holding bachelors’ degrees from Canadian and Non-Canadian universities.

Start Date

Canadian

Non-Canadian

Regular

(September)

June 1

March 1

Winter

(January)

October 1

July 1

Spring

(May)

February 1

November 1

Summer

(July)

April 1

January 1

Program Requirements

In addition to the minimum course requirements of the Faculty of Graduate Studies found in the Graduate Studies Regulations Section of this Calendar, a minimum of three years (including the year spent in M.Sc. work) is required for the Ph.D. degree. Actual time spent is usually somewhat longer.

Colloquium: A weekly colloquium is given by members of staff, post-doctoral fellows, or invited lecturers. All graduate students and fourth-year Honours students are expected to attend the colloquia.

Second language requirement: none

Expected time to graduation: 4-5 years (from 4 year B.Sc.); 3 years (from M.Sc.)

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